<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 10/9/05, <b class="gmail_sendername">Greg Burch</b> <<a href="mailto:gregburch@gregburch.net">gregburch@gregburch.net</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Since
I was old enough to read, I've been engaged by projections about the
future.  My favorite parts of the set of children's
encyclopedias we had in the early 1960s were those that provided
projections about the future. They showed me such wonderful visions:
Atomic-powered cars! Cities under the sea!  Vacations on the
Moon! All this would come to be by the time I would be the age my
parents were then.  Well now I am that age and we know what
happened to all of those glossy futures.<br><br>But somehow, I never
seem to learn.  Seven years ago, we had a discussion here on
the List about what we called "near-term projections" for the future to
c. 2015.  I gathered together some of the ideas in that
discussion and put them in what I called a "futurist time
capsule."  Here it is:<br><br>       <a href="http://www.gregburch.net/writing/NearTerm.htm">http://www.gregburch.net/writing/NearTerm.htm</a><br><br>It
makes for interesting and, in many instances, painful
reading.  Bear in mind that this was the vision some of us
had in the Spring of 1998.  We were surfing at the zenith of
the 1990s Bubble.  The Collapse of the Bubble, 911, Enron,
Columbia  all were in the future.<br><br>What do you take away from looking back on looking forward?<br><br></blockquote></div><br>
That the future isn't what it used to be.<br>
<br>
Dirk<br>