<br><br>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 0pt 48.45pt; TEXT-INDENT: -18pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list 48.45pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-style: italic">
<span style="mso-list: Ignore"><span style="FONT: 7pt 'Times New Roman'">         </span></span></span><i><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman">Overview</font></span></i><span lang="EN-CA" style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial">
 </span><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt">Here's the script from an Agroforestry story March 21, 2006:</span><i><span lang="EN-CA"></span></i></font></p>
<div><span lang="EN-CA" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">Dale Neufeld<br>
News Director<br>CTV Saskatoon/Prince Albert <br>(306) 665-9246<br><br>Premier Lorne Calvert admits it's an ambitious goal. The Premier has set a<br>target of converting 10 per cent of Saskatchewan's farmland over to<br>agroforestry within 20 years. He thinks tree production will be a good way 
<br>for farmers to make money off of marginal land.</span></div><span lang="EN-CA" style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">

<div><br>(200,000acres/year)</div>
<div><br>Premier Lorne Calvert: "We have work to do with industry. We have work to do<br>in market development. No use in planting trees if there are no markets. We<br>have important decisions to make around issues, around taxation, incentive
<br>programs."<br><br>Trees grown by farmers could be turned into lumber, biofuel or other<br>products. 50 Saskatchewan farmers have already planted 15 hundred acres to <br>hybrid poplars as part of a pilot federal program. Calvert says moving
<br>agroforestry into large-scale production will need further research and new<br>policies from governments to help farmers diversify into growing trees. <br><br>Calvert: "We need to ensure that producers will have adequate return and
<br>adequate source of income as they make that transition. And there may be a<br>variety of creative ways that we can accomplish that, working with the <br>public sector, working with the private sector."<br><br>Calvert says world demand for lumber and wood products continues to grow,
<br>which should help generate more interest in agroforestry. Proponents are<br>hopeful agroforestry in Saskatchewan can succeed. But they're also <br>encouraging producers to proceed with caution.<br><br>Bill Sullivan/Melfort Agroforester: "We're not expecting farmers to go out
<br>and plant you know hundreds of acres now, you know immediately. We suggest<br>that you plant maybe 10 acres every year. So there is a perpetual supply." <br><br>Bill Sullivan says expansion of agroforestry in Saskatchewan
 can be part of<br>the green economy and help Canada meet targets for reducing </div></span>