<div class="gmail_quote">2011/4/22 spike <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:spike66@att.net">spike66@att.net</a>></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple"><div><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;color:#1F497D">Ö</span><span style="font-size:10.0pt"> <b>On Behalf Of </b>Adrian Tymes<br><b>Subject:</b> Re: [ExI] Alzheimer</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">One simple stopgap measure: increased mental activity.† Like, a regimen of one Sudoku (or more dedicated stuff, like one Brain Age session) per day.<span style="color:#1F497D">† Adrian</span></p><p><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(31, 73, 125); ">Ja, and hereís one for you: do variations on your favorite puzzles that exercise the brain in ways that it isnít accustomed to doing.† We get too good at certain tasks and fool ourselves because we are better than everyone around.† But it isnít working the brain as much as we think it is.†</span></p>
</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yes, I also suspect that what would ordinarily lead to an improvement of cognitive capabilities may also involve a diminished and slower loss thereof, by helping you to make better and better use of the decreasing number of neurons you have to do with.</div>
</div><div><br></div><div>After all, some room for improvement is definitely there even when neuron loss is firmly in place simply as a consequence of aging... With Alzheimer, it might be just the same, even though you have to run on a much more slippery and steep slope.</div>
<div><br></div>-- <br>Stefano Vaj<br>